Skip to content

What is the Name of…?

March 21, 2011

Yesterday, we covered asking a person what his or her name is:

  • Dè an t-ainm a th’ort? (inf/sg)  (Jay ahn TAHN-im a horsht?)  What is your name? (informal/ singular)
  • Dè an t-ainm a th’oirbh?  (Jay ahn TAHN-im a HORE-iv?)  What is your name? (formal/ plural)  

Remember that ort and oirbh are amalgamated pronouns, combining air (on) with thu and sibh (the informal/singular and formal/plural words for you).

If you want to ask the name of a thing, air is once again used, but not amalgamated.  Using a few nouns from previous lessons to review, we get:

  • Dè an t-ainm a tha air an taigh-osda? (Jay ahn TAHN-im a ha air ahn TIE-OHS-da?) Literally, What is the name on the hotel? Or, as we would say in English, what is the name of the hotel?
  • Dè an t-ainm a tha air an iasg?  (Jay ahn TAHN-im a ha air ahn EE-usk?)  What is the name on the fish?
  • Dè an t-ainm a tha air an taisbeanadh?   (Jay ahn TAHN-im a ha air ahn TAHSH-be-uh-nagh?)  What is the name on the exhibition?
  • Dè an t-ainm a tha air an taigh-tasgaidh?  (Jay ahn TAHN-im a ha air ahn TIE-TAHS-gee?) What is the name on the museum?

Try the sentence with other nouns learned in previous lessons.  Or, use Dwelly to look up new nouns.  But remember two things:

  • Nouns beginning with b, c, g, m, or p will lenite, and the word for ‘the’ will become a’, not an.
  • Nouns beginning with f also lenite, but retain ‘an’ for the.

Instead of listening today, here’s a site I found with Gaelic Poetry: Gaelic Poetry Nook

Just found the site?  Start with Lesson One.

 

Advertisements
4 Comments leave one →
  1. Renea permalink
    March 23, 2011 5:18 pm

    tapadh leat

  2. Carolyn permalink
    April 6, 2011 10:23 pm

    Nice link. Amazing I hadn’t found it or your Site before now, & I really looked! Great lessons, too.

  3. Carolyn permalink
    April 6, 2011 10:25 pm

    I meant the poetry link. Already have Dwelly. 🙂

  4. April 7, 2011 3:47 am

    Hi, Carolyn,

    Thank you! I’m amazed how many really great links I find on the web for even a ‘smaller’ language like Scottish Gaelic! I’ve been meaning to get back to that site and spend more time reading it.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: