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GOT more

April 4, 2019
  • Fhuair thu reòteag. (HOOR oo ROH chahk) You got ice cream.
  • Fhuair mi am pàipear dhuibh. (HOOR mee ahm PA peer YA veh) I got you the (news) paper.
  • Fhuair mi an còta ùr an-dè(HOOR me ahn COH tah OOR ahn JAY.) I got the new coat yesterday.

Remember that the R is rolled, producing something closer to our English D…but not quite! And the two OOs are made with very rounded, protruding lips, not our oo.

Remember adjectives come after nouns.

THE GIVEAWAY

There are many ways to gain entries to win the book. You can do one, some, or all. Tweeting and sharing can be done every day to earn more entries. The giveaway is open until April 30. Look for others to follow. Have fun!

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Besides am balach and an tidsear…

April 3, 2019

On Diciadain (Wednesday) mommy shows up!

  • Rinn mamaidh an tì. (RINN MAH mee ahn tee) Mommy made the tea.
  • Fhuair am balach an tì.
  • Chunnaic an tidsear an tì.

Check previous lessons if you don’t remember what some of these words mean. Feel free to write the answers in the comments. Are they past or present tense?

Remember that the R is rolled, producing something closer to our English D…but not quite!

Reviewing from a few posts ago:

  • Dh ‘aithris am balach na leasain.
  • Rinn am balach na leasain.
  • Fuair am balach na leasain.

There are many ways to gain entries to win the book. You can do one, some, or all. Tweeting and sharing can be done every day to earn more entries. The giveaway is open until April 30. Look for others to follow. Have fun!

GWAD book cover

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

More about an tidsear

April 2, 2019

Fun Fact: Diluain (Monday) means day of the moon.

Dimàirt (JI MAIRSHT, Tuesday) means day of Mars.

Using full sentences about an tidsear (and mix these sentences up — leave your answers in the comments –about am balach):

  • Chunnaic an tidsear na leasain.
  • Thug an tidsear na leasain dhan chlas. (HOUK ahn TICH air na LAY suhn ghahn chlahs) The teacher gave the lessons to the class.
  • Chuala an tidsear na leasain.

Here would be a good time to review:

There are many ways to gain entries to win the book. Tweeting and sharing can be done every day to earn more entries. The giveaway is open until April 30. Look for others to follow. Have fun!

GWAD book cover

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

An tidsear … at school

April 1, 2019

It’s Diluain! An tidsear has shown up to join his diligent student!

  • Chunnaic an tidsear….  (HOON ich ahn TICH air) The teacher saw…
  • Thug an tidsear…. (HOUK ahn TICH air) the teacher gave….
  • Chuala an tidsear……. (HOOL uh ahn TICH air) The teacher heard….

Here would be a good time to review:

There are many ways to gain entries to win the book. Tweeting and sharing can be done every day to earn more entries. The giveaway is open until April 30. Look for others to follow. Have fun!

GWAD book cover

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

Am balach…at school

March 31, 2019

In yesterday’s leasan, dh’aithris am balach…. We don’t know what he recited, but never mind. Onto more things the boy is busy with at school today. (Why he’s at school on Là na Sàbaid; I guess he’s just that avid a learner!)

  • rinn am balach… (RINN ahm BAH luch) the boy did….
  • fhuair am balach (HOOR ahm BAH luch) the boy got….

Remember that the R is rolled, producing something closer to our English D…but not quite!

Putting yesterday’s and today’s leasain together:

  • Dh ‘aithris am balach na leasain.
  • Rinn am balach na leasain.
  • Fuair am balach na leasain.

There are many ways to gain entries to win the book. You can do one, some, or all. Tweeting and sharing can be done every day to earn more entries. The giveaway is open until April 30. Look for others to follow. Have fun!

GWAD book cover

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

Back to School! and a prize available

March 30, 2019

Hello to all!

My apologies for the disappearing trick. I have a magician friend who’s been showing me how to make rabbits disappear, but it wasn’t quite like that. My laptop casing broke and a promised 5 day repair and return became ten. It’s back, I have a day off teaching, and that means many posts will be written and scheduled to show up over the coming week or two!

Scroll down for the giveaway of a course book, Teach Yourself Gaelic by Boyd Robertson and Iain Taylor.

Today’s words:

  • an leasan (ahn LIS ahn) the lesson
  • na leasain (nah LES in) the lessons
  • dh’aithris am balach… (YAH rish ahm BAHL uch) the boy recited…. (do students still recite anything in school?)

Here would be a good time to review how to make plurals:

There are many ways to gain entries to win the book. Tweeting and sharing can be done every day to earn more entries. The giveaway is open until April 30. Look for others to follow. Have fun!

GWAD book cover

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Cait’ as Caite Can

March 15, 2019
tags:

Okay, that title was a hilarious bilingual play on words. Cait (catch) as caite (catch) can…get it? In Gaelic, it would be pronounced CAHCH (as) CAHCH uh CAHN.

Okay, it was a stretch and my kids would roll their eyes and groan, but I maintain that puns are the highest form of humor. Plus, I’ve had my fun for the day! (And my kids would be laughing, despite themselves, as they groaned.)

Can in case you’re wondering, can (no bilingual pun intended) mean several things according to Dwelly’s Gaelic dictionary, but it will typically mean say. According to Glosbesay, state, tell.

Cait/caite means where. And where as where say doesn’t actually make any sense. So I guess the pun falls apart.

A question was raised on a prior post about the phrase caite bheil: isn’t it spelled càit a bheil? I am not an expert. I am a learner myself as noted in START THE COURSE HERE.

I study when I have time but there are many details and nuances to language. My Secret Sources TM told me the phrase in question was Càite bheil. So the question prompted me to dig into the details of cait’ / caite and bheil vs a bheil. 

The first thing I found was that, indeed, my Secret Sources TM did say the phrase was càite bheil. In fact, many sources around the web say càite bheil rather than càit a bheil. The web being what it is, however, it’s possible one site made a typo or mistake and all the others copied and pasted. So I did some more research.

Glosbe gives this list of phrases with the word where:

Gaelic Cait and Caite

Note that they always  use càite, never càit’.  Note, too, that they sometimes use bheil and sometimes a bheil. And nowhere do I see càit’ a bheil, which is how I originally learned it.

My printed course material, on the other hand, lists càite/ càit’ in the dictionary at the back but so far I have only seen them use càit’ in the actual lessons.

In further research, it seems that, as I had thought already from previous study, càit’ is, essentially, what we would call a contraction of càite. The word may especially be shortened to càit’ the the a bheil after it because the  and the are pronounced the same and it’s an awkward bump in the road, trying to pronounce e a so it’s smoothed out to càit’ a bheil, thus eliminating the repetitive sound.

So it seems the phrase is used in all these ways, depending on the speaker. In our own language, I’m sure we have many such examples. Ah, the fun of learning a language!

 

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